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Tag Archives: #newyearsresolutions

Should You Try Intermittent Fasting for Weight Loss and Better Health? 

Surprise! You fast every day.

It’s that time of year when millions of us make eating resolutions that we won’t keep. If you’re tired of restrictive diets that you can’t possibly stick with, you may wonder if you should consider intermittent fasting for weight loss and better health, too.

What is Intermittent Fasting?

Fasting is going without food. While that may sound drastic, consider that you fast every day while you’re asleep and between meals!

Intermittent fasting (IF) limits when you eat, not what you eat. IF is not a diet. It’s an eating pattern without the calorie-counting. 

There are several types of IF, including:

• Fasting every other day of the week.  

• The 5:2 plan: Eat as usual on five days of the week. Limit calories to 25% of your needs (500 calories on a 2000-calorie eating plan) on two non-consecutive days, such as Monday and Thursday.

• Time-Restricted Eating (TRE) limits food intake for at least 12 hours, and for as long as 20 hours, every day.  For example, you can choose to eat all your food from 10 AM to 6 PM, or during any other time frame that works for you.

Researchs suggests intermittent fasting for weight loss and better health is promising. TRE is the least restrictive and most adaptable form of IF, and it makes the most sense for people with a busy lifestyle. However, no type of IF is suitable for children, pregnant and breastfeeding women, people with eating disorders, and some people with diabetes.

 An RD’s experience with intermittent fasting

Satisfaction is key to maintaining a healthy eating plan.

Intermittent Fasting for Weight Loss  

While I’m a fan of TRE, evidence suggests that any form of intermittent fasting is just as good for weight loss as eating fewer calories overall. However, TRE can jump-start your intentions to eat better, and may reduce feelings of dietary deprivation.

In one study, overweight people who reduced their eating window from about 15 hours a day to 10 to 11 hours daily for 16 weeks lost weight, and reported higher energy levels and better sleep. Even though they weren’t asked to restrict calories, participants ate less without feeling deprived.

Spend most of your time fasting asleep.

In another study, a group of overweight people who ate only from 10 AM to 6 PM consumed an average of 350 fewer calories and lost about 3% of their body weight. They also lowered their blood pressure.  Study subjects were not asked to limit calorie intake.

TRE and other forms of IF may help with modest calorie restriction, but fasting is not a magic bullet for weight control. Whether or not time-restricted eating actually decreases the amount of food consumed varies from person to person.

Intermittent Fasting for Better Health

Chances are, you can reap health benefits from IF simply by changing when you eat most of your calories. Here’s why.

IF improves the body’s response to insulin.  Insulin is the hormone produced in the pancreas that is necessary for cells to absorb glucose, which is used for energy. Insulin levels are lower when fasting, an ideal situation to prevent insulin resistance.

In insulin resistance, blood glucose levels are elevated. High insulin levels trigger the pancreas to produce more insulin to try to get glucose into cells. As time goes on, the pancreas’ ability to churn out insulin declines, leading to prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes and contributing to the risk for heart diseaseand cancer.

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In addition, TRE plans that limit food consumption to daytime coordinate best with our natural body rhythms, which may help foster good health. That’s because insulin production is higher during the day than at night.

Even without weight loss, limiting food intake to eight hours and fasting from 3 PM on every day for five weeks decreased insulin levels, reduced insulin resistance, and improved blood pressure in overweight men with prediabetes.

Eating later in the day can be bad for your waistline and your health

How to Try Time Restricted Eating

Be consistent.  Choose an eating/fasting pattern that works for you and stick to it every day, including on weekends. Start by limiting food intake to 12 hours daily, and try to stop eating by 6 or 7 PM. If you want, gradually decrease your eating window to eight hours with 16 hours of fasting daily.

Eat a balanced diet. Plan your food intake to include adequate amounts of nutritious foods, and limit added sugar. Eat three satisfying meals daily to avoid excessive snacking, also known as “grazing”.  Grazing is linked to a higher body mass index in women and a poorer quality diet in women and men. 

Remember that moderation counts. IF doesn’t involve calorie-counting, but if you use your eating window as a free-for-all, you’re missing the point. You can eat whatever you want, but maybe not as much as you want. 

Focus on calorie-free fluids. Water, black coffee and tea, and other calorie-free beverages are OK at any time.

All foods fit on any intermittent fasting program, but moderation counts, too.
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5 No-Diet New Year’s Resolutions

It’s a new year, and a good time to renew your commitment to healthy eating. Here’s my advice about how to do just that, without taking drastic steps that will derail your vows in a few weeks, or less.  If you want to make improvements, focus on progress, not perfection.

Do. Not. Diet.

Let’s face it: diets suck.

Food is fuel, and you must eat to survive and thrive. Fad diets are tempting, but ignore their false promises, and focus instead on improving your eating pattern for longterm success.

Quitting every favorite food will not fly in the long run. The best way to eat is one that you can live with. As my colleague Shelley Real so aptly puts it, “Eating isn’t cheating.”

I couldn’t have said it better myself!

Read about one thing that can lead to a longterm healthy relationship with food. 

Eat to burn more calories.  

We nutrition experts encourage eating whole grains for their fiber, and other nutrients. But did you know that whole grains are also metabolism boosters?

Whole grains include cereals, breads, grains, and popcorn. Eat at least three servings daily, or even better, make all of your grains the whole kind.

Read: The only way to keep your resolutions.

Don’t play the dieting numbers game.

Consider ditching the bathroom scale and the tape measure for good. Constantly taking stock of your weight can be a downward spiral, especially when weight loss doesn’t occur as quickly as you like. Focus on eating better for overall health rather than what your scale and tape measure say.

Stop the body shaming.

So you overindulged during the holidays, or you ate too much and didn’t exercise over the weekend.

So what?

Punishing yourself is pointless, and shame is a useless and harmful emotion that will get you nowhere, and fast.

Good health is not an all-or-nothing endeavor.  Some days, weeks, and months are better than others when it comes to eating and exercising. Each day – each meal, for that matter –  is a new chance to make better choices.

Discover how to get more Body Kindness.

Stay positive about a better eating plan. 

There are certain phrases I never use, including “fat” (as it relates to body weight), “skinny,” and “clean eating.”  Why? Because they have negative connotations that contribute to a disordered relationship with food.

“Guilty pleasures,” “cheat days,” and “detox” are not on my vocabulary list, either. Hopefully, if you stop using these useless phrases too, you’ll improve your attitude about food.

What are your non-diet goals for the year ahead?

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