Monthly Archives: June 2018

No-Bake Oatmeal Raisin Cookies (no added sugar, gluten-free, vegan)

No-bake no added sugar gluten-free vegan oatmeal raisin cookies on cutting board.

No-Bake Oatmeal Raisin Cookies (No added sugar)

There’s nothing wrong with cookies as part of a balanced eating plan, but you should get more than calories, added sugar, and unhealthy fats when you eat them.  With 8 grams of protein and 5 grams of fiber, No-Bake Oatmeal Raisin Cookies, which have no added sugar, are vegan, and happen to be gluten-free, are a better way to satisfy your sweet tooth! 

Why You Should Make No-Bake Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

My idea of a delicious cookie recipe is combination of oats, peanut butter, raisins, and pure vanilla extract.  Raisins make these cookies naturally sweet, and they need no added sugar. In addition, these cookies vegan and gluten-free when you use gluten-free oats.  


No-Bake Oatmeal Raisin Cookies are also 100% whole grain and help to satisfy the suggestion from nutrition experts to eat at least three servings of whole grains daily.  


I love the ease of making these cookies. They are ready to eat in about 5 minutes, and one batch is often enough to last the week.  That’s important for busy people who can’t spend a lot of time in the kitchen preparing healthy foods, but want to improve their eating habits. 

 

uncooked oatmeal oats

Oatmeal is a whole grain that adds fiber and other nutrients.

creamy peanut butter on a spoon

Peanut butter is packed with healthy fat and helps hold these no-bake cookies together.

plain raisins on a white background

Raisins are sweet, but they contain no added sugar!

Healthy Breakfast Cookies for Kids 

We usually think of cookies as snacks or dessert, but they work for the morning meal, too! You eat breakfast for dinner, so why not cookies for breakfast?


Cookies for breakfast are a big hit with kids, and they will love having them as snacks or desserts, too!


If you don’t like cereal, eggs, or other traditional “morning foods” for breakfast, or you don’t have time to eat before leaving the house, these cookies are for you. One No-Bake Oatmeal Raisin Cookie paired with milk, fortified unsweetened soy beverage, or a carton of yogurt and a piece of fruit makes a balanced morning meal.

5 no-bake oatmeal raisin cookies on parchment paper

No-Bake Oatmeal Raisin Cookies are OK to eat any time of day!

 

No-Bake Oatmeal Raisin Cookies (no added sugar, gluten-free, vegan)

These cookies are ready in minutes, require no cooking, and are delicious for breakfast or snacks!
Prep Time5 mins
Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: American
Keyword: cookies, glutenfree, no added sugar, peanutbutter, raisins
Servings: 10
Calories: 292kcal

Ingredients

  • 2 cups California raisins
  • 1 cup peanut butter, no sugar added
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 2 cups uncooked oats, toasted*

Instructions

  • Place raisins, peanut butter, and vanilla extract in food processor. Blend on HIGH until well combined, about 45 seconds.  The mixture will resemble a paste. 
  • Place the raisin mixture in a medium bowl. Add oatmeal and combine well, using your hands, if necessary.  Form into 10 cookies or balls. 
  • Store in airtight container.

How to Toast Oats

  • To toast oats, preheat oven to 350˚F. Spread the oats evenly on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes. Cool for 5 minutes before using. You can save time by skipping this step.

Notes

Per serving (1 cookie): 292 calories; 8 grams protein; 39 grams carbohydrate; 5 grams fiber; 14 grams fat (2 grams saturated fat); 0 milligrams cholesterol; 164 milligrams sodium; 60 milligrams calcium.

 

No-bake oatmeal raisin cookies pinterest graphic

Pasta Salad with Chickpeas and Cottage Cheese

 

Pasta salad with cottage cheese and chickpeas.

Whole wheat pasta and chickpeas provide fiber and other nutrients that support health.

 

Macaroni salad is a staple at summertime picnics and BBQs across America. While this perennial favorite gets gobbled up by the ton every year, I can’t say that I’m a fan of the typical recipe. Pasta salad with chickpeas and cottage cheese is a better, more satisfying twist on this American favorite.

 


Read: Dozens of recipes for pasta salad with all kinds of interesting ingredients.


Meat and vegetables on skewers on a charcoal grill.

Pasta salad can be served as a side dish with meat or fish.

Pasta Salad is Good for You

Pasta salad with chickpeas and cottage cheese isn’t only for the warmer months; it can be a healthy option year-round, too. Here’s why.

Cooked and cooled pasta (any kind) is a source of resistant starch, a type of fiber that feeds the beneficial bacteria in the gut that help prevent colon cancer and support overall health. Legumes, such as chickpeas, and cooked and cooled potatoes, also provide resistant starch. Foods rich in fiber can help prevent, and manage, prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

Meatless Vegetarian Pasta Salad Recipe

I like a hearty pasta salad that’s more than a side dish.  Here’s how I build a better pasta salad to enjoy as a meatless meal or as a side dish.

Whole wheat pasta. Whole wheat pasta is a great way to include whole grains. I like the slightly nutty taste of whole wheat pasta, which is higher in fiber than the regular kind. I favor shapes such as rotini because the ridges hold onto the dressing.

Overhead shot of uncooked whole wheat pasta.

Whole wheat pasta is brimming with manganese, a mineral you need for strong bones and cartilage, and for many other bodily functions.


Read: Why carbohydrates are good for you


Legumes. Chickpeas, a type of legume, and pasta are a satisfying combo that you can really sink your teeth into.  Legumes provide protein, and fiber, which helps to better regulate your energy levels, and they supply iron, folate, and phytonutrients, which are plant compounds that protect cells from damage.

Cottage cheese. I like cheese in my pasta salad for the taste, as well as the protein and calcium. Using low fat cottage cheese in place of some of the feta cheese cuts down on calories and saturated fat.

Bowl of cottage cheese with a wooden spoon.

Low fat cottage cheese has 11 times less saturated fat than feta cheese, but is lower in calcium.

 

Plate of Pasta Salad with Cottage Cheese and Chickpeas.

Pasta Salad with Cottage Cheese and Chickpeas can be a side dish or a main meal.

 

Pasta Salad with Chickpeas and Cottage Cheese

Delicious pasta salad that's good for you, too!
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Salad
Cuisine: American
Keyword: chickpeas, cottagecheese, cottagecheeserecipe, macaronisalad, pastasalad
Servings: 12

Ingredients

  • 16 ounces whole wheat rotini pasta, uncooked
  • 1 15-ounce can chickpeas, drained
  • 2 1/2 cups cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/2 cup finely diced red onion
  • 1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

Instructions

  • Cook pasta until just about done (al dente). Drain well and place pasta in a large serving bowl.
  • Add the chickpeas, tomatoes, parsley, onion, cottage cheese, and feta cheese. Combine well.
  • In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, salt, and pepper. Add the dressing to the pasta mixture and toss until well combined. Serve chilled.

Notes

Per serving: 253 calories; 10 grams protein; 40 grams carbohydrate; 6 grams fiber; 7 grams fat (2 grams saturated fat); 6 milligrams cholesterol; 284 milligrams sodium; 80 milligrams calcium.

Pasta salad with chickpeas and cottage cheese

 

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